H2 company does deal with AEG

UK-based hydrogen technology and energy storage company ITM Power has announced it has signed an agreement with AEG Power Solutions to integrate its electrolyser technology with AEG’s power control electronics. Under the agreement, ITM Power and AEG will initially address five projects, ranging from imminent deployment to early proposal development.

This agreement with ITM represents the first time AEG’s power conversion technology will be coupled with polymer exchange membrane electrolysis, enabling rapid-response electrolysis at a scale appropriate for electricity grid balancing services, says ITM.

Scientists reveal lithium-ion secrets

Physicists at the US Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory and collaborating institutions have developed methods of examining lithium-ion reactions in real-time to a nanoscale (billionths-of-a-metre) precision, offering unprecedented insights into processes that are vital to battery technology, reports NanoWerk.

“(L)ive, nanoscale imaging may help pave the way for developing longer-lasting, higher-capacity lithium-ion batteries. That means better consumer electronics and the potential for large-scale, emission-free energy storage,” commented Feng Wang, one of the key researchers on the project.

Leclanché obtains €5m bailout loan

Swiss lithium-ion battery producer Leclanché has announced that its German subsidiary, Leclanché GmbH, has obtained a €5 million (USD$6.5 million) bridging loan from the Bruellan Corporate Governance Action Fund, to cover its short-term funding needs. The loan expires in March 2013 and is secured with assets of Leclanché GmbH.

Both parties have agreed that following a capital increase to raise further funds for Leclanché SA, Bruellan has the right to convert the loan into shares of Leclanché.

Mitsubishi to demonstrate energy storage

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and SSE (formerly Scottish and Southern Energy) are planning a 2MW lithium-ion energy storage system project in the Orkney Islands. The project aims at demonstrating power supply stabilisation in the region, which currently enjoys a large but variable quantity of wind-produced renewable energy.

It will be conducted with the support of the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organisation of Japan and should go live in early 2013.

US molten salt project gets green light

The US solar developer SolarReserve this weekconfirmed it has received the final Arizona State approval required to go ahead with its Crossroads Solar Energy Project. This aims to supply approximately 500,000MW annually of reliable, sustainable, zero-emission electricity to Arizona or California, enough to power up to 100,000 homes during peak electricity periods, says the company.

The project comprises 150MW of electrical generating capacity using concentrating solar power, plus 65MW of additional solar photovoltaic technology. Up to 10 hours of solar energy per day will be stored using the company’s molten salt power tower technology, says SolarReserve. Construction of the site, near Gila Bend, should begin late this year, or in early 2013.

Your chance to boost EU energy storage

Don’t forget about the public consultation on the European Investment Bank’s (EIB) Energy Sector Lending Policy. The policy will decide where in the energy sector Europe is going to spend its citizens’ tax money, and it is our opportunity to persuade the Eurocrats that energy storage should feature prominently in the expenditure.

You have until 31 December 2012 to make the industry’s case and you can also attend a meeting that will take place on 7 December 2012 in Brussels. Additional information about this public consultation, including background material about the scope of the review, can be found on the EIB web site. Get involved and help promote the energy storage sector in Europe.

New solar storage possibilities from MIT

Scientists at the prestigious Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have produced modified carbon nanotubes that can store solar energy indefinitely after being charged up by sunlight, says the university.

Although nano materials that store sunlight in chemical bonds have been produced before, researchers on this project say that the new material, which is made using carbon nanotubes in combination with a compound called azobenzene, has a much higher energy density than earlier solutions. In fact the energy density of this solutions is comparable to that of lithium-ion batteries.